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Ausrine Stundyte as Cio-Cio-San, Elizabeth Janes as Butterfly’s child and Sarah Larsen as Suzuki in Seattle Opera's production of Puccini's Madama Butterfly. Photo by Elise Bakketun.
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Would you like your press releases and announcements featured on the OPERA America website and in OperaLink? Submit the url to your announcement in the "Submit a Press Release" section. Press releases must be hosted on your own site or through a third-party site like Google Docs or PitchEngine. Please contact Patricia K. Johnson at PKJohnson@operaamerica.org with questions.
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Main Page Headlines
The Metropolitan Opera: 'deep in crisis'
Rupert ChristiansenThe Telegraph
New York’s Metropolitan Opera is deep in crisis, and even the armistice this week, concluding months of open warfare with its unions, is unlikely to bring either victory or resolution – or even a way forward.
Vittorio Grigolo on Getting Young People to the Opera
Rosamaria ManciniWall Street Journal
VITTORIO GRIGOLO IS the tenor of the moment. The 37-year-old Italian first made a name for himself singing the key role of Rudolfo in "La Bohème" at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2010 and since then has become the important young male face of the opera world. The former Sistine Chapel chorister will end his summer tour with a return to the 13,000-seat Arena di Verona. He will play Romeo in Charles Gounod's "Roméo et Juliette" (Aug. 23, 28 and Sept. 6; arena.it ), based on Shakespeare's timeless love story.
After 3 seasons, it's curtains for Lyric Opera Virginia
Teresa AnnasHamptonRoads.com
Lyric Opera Virginia survived three seasons during an economic downturn, but dwindling audiences and insufficient cash caused the nonprofit company to quietly close its doors in late spring.
Metropolitan Opera Clears Last Major Hurdle in Labor Talks
Michael CooperThe New York Times
The Metropolitan Opera and the union representing its stagehands reached a contract deal early Wednesday morning, clearing the last major hurdle before the company could go ahead with its coming season of operas featuring murderously jealous lovers, dying sopranos and a fellow named Figaro — both before and after his marriage.
Has There Ever Been a Music of the Future?
Fred PlotkinOperavore
Fred Plotkin ponders "The Music of the Future," which Wagner discussed in a pamphlet in 1861. This essay was a response to readers and critics who, Wagner said, misinterpreted or did not understand the ideas he put forth in his 1850 treatise, 'Das Kunstwerk der Zukunft' (The Artwork of the Future). 
14 Artists Who Are Transforming The Future Of Opera
Priscilla FrankHuffington Post
Opera, which translates to "work" in Italian, doesn't only refer to women in viking helmets singing high notes in a foreign language. The medium officially extends to any dramatic art form in which all parts are sung to instrumental accompaniment, and it's evolved far past the "La Bohème" you dozed off to on your middle school field trip. (No offense, Puccini.) Although The Met may not be tapping into today's boldest operatic experiments, that's not to say they're not out there.
The Met averts shutdown: Does opera have to be grand to survive? (+video)
Harry BruiniusChristian Science Monitor
The live spectacle and resounding, unamplified human voices of opera, its dwindling number of aficionados say, is something the digital age, even with its many wonders, can never top.
Colorado Hiker Sings Opera to Calm Stalking Mountain Lion
Daniel XuOutdoor Hub
Can music soothe a savage beast? If you were to ask 40-year-old Kyra Kopenstonsky, she will tell you that it might have saved her from a cougar attack. Kopenstonsky was hiking a trail near Down Valley Park in Placerville, Colorado on Monday when she encountered a mountain lion. According to a report by the San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office, the lion stalked the hiker for about 20 minutes, during which it would often jump forward and crouch whenever Kopenstonsky attempted to move backwards. She told deputies that when she first saw the animal, she picked up a large branch and attempted to look big. That did not seem to faze the cat, so Kopenstonsky said she did the next thing that came to her mind.
John Adams Explains Why His Northridge Earthquake Opera Took 19 Years to Reach L.A.
Christian HertzogLA Weekly
It’s not a musical — there’s no dialogue between the songs. 

It’s not a traditional opera — there are no musical transitions from one emotional moment to the next.

Composer John Adams calls I Was Looking at the Ceiling and Then I Saw the Sky a “songplay.” Librettist June Jordan calls it an “earthquake romance.” However their collaboration is pigeonholed, it hasn’t been heard in California since its world premiere in 1995 in Berkeley; the only professional American performance after its original run in Montreal, New York and Europe was in Cleveland 12 years ago.

Play it again: how to make an opera’s second run a success
Tim MurrayThe Guardian
How do you make an old and over-performed opera feel fresh and new? Start by reexamining the score, writes one conductor
Musical Chairs in S.F. Opera Administration
Janos GerebenSan Francisco Classical Voice
The San Francisco Opera's Director of Production, Greg Weber, will become Tulsa Opera's managing director in October. The search has begun to find his successor. 
Metropolitan Opera and Two Unions Reach a Tentative Deal
Michael CooperThe New York Times
The Metropolitan Opera reached tentative agreements early Monday morning with the unions representing its orchestra and chorus after an all-night bargaining session, and called off its threat to lock out workers a little more than a month before the new season is set to open.
Opera Goes Modern With Game of Thrones and Breaking Bad
Max BartlettNorthwest Public Radio
Opera is sometimes seen as stuffy, old-fashioned, even a little... you know. Elitist. But some operas are working to change that. Opera on Tap in Seattle works to make opera part of our musical pop culture, and Washington's Lyric Light Opera performs popular musicals such as the Music Man, and even adaptations of Beauty and the Beast.
Arts: When understudies triumph
Nick GalvinSydney Morning Herald
After soprano Jane Ede heard she might be needed to step in at the last minute to the demanding lead role on the opening night of The Elixir of Love, her reaction was understandable.
"When I first got word there was a possibility I might be on, my husband found me on the floor in the foetal position going, ‘No, no, no, no, nooo’, because the task seemed fairly insurmountable at that point," she says.


In Surprise Finale at Metropolitan Opera’s Labor Talks, Both Sides Agree to Cuts
Michael CooperThe New York Times
After months of harsh words and escalating threats of a lockout, the Met and the unions representing its orchestra and chorus looked into the abyss and reached a tentative deal early on Monday, agreeing to significant and somewhat surprising cuts.
Licia Albanese, Exalted Soprano, Is Dead at 105
Margalit FoxThe New York Times
Licia Albanese, an Italian-born soprano whose veneration by audiences worldwide was copious even by the standards of operatic adulation, died on Friday at her home in Manhattan. She was 105.
Opera Idaho elects new board members
StaffIdaho Business Review
Vicki Kreimeyer and Andrew Owczarek have been elected to the Opera Idaho board of directors.
Cristina Deutekom dies at 82
StaffDutch News
The world famous Dutch coloratura soprano Cristina Deutekom died on Thursday evening. She was 82 years old. 
Revised Ending
Fred CohnOpera News
It is one of the strangest chapters in the history of American opera. Earlier this year, working with key members of his board, Ian Campbell, the general director, artistic director and CEO of San Diego Opera, determined that the company he had led for thirty-one years should shut its doors. He almost succeeded in getting his way.
Lifting the Curtain on Live Events
StaffThinkWithGoogle.com
The data is in and interest is up: More people are attending live events—concerts, sports and theater—than ever before. How are they researching and buying tickets to these events?
Met’s Labor Woes Divide Opera Fans as Well as Participants
Michael CooperThe New York Times
The conflict, which threatens to silence the Met before its new season gets underway next month, is reverberating far beyond the travertine walls of the opera house. Opera buffs across America and the world, who have become part of the Met’s extended family through its Saturday radio broadcasts and live cinema transmissions, are watching closely and weighing in.
Why We've Been Seeing More 'Yellowface' In Recent Months
Sam SandersNPR
You might have heard a lot about "yellowface" in recent months. It's the word widely used to refer to someone donning make-up or clothing to present the appearance of looking Asian. But why is it that we're seeing the word — and the phenomenon it refers to — so much this year? Is it because it's happening more, or are we just more aware?
A spate of accolades as Jenkins departs Seattle Opera
Nicole BrodeurSeattle Times
All night, the accolades and the Champagne flowed. But so did the tears, as the Seattle Opera community said goodbye to Speight Jenkins after his 31 years as general director.
Fort Worth Opera announces cast of JFK opera
Betty DillardFort Worth Business Press
Fort Worth Opera in collaboration with American Lyric Theater in New York City announced the cast of the 2016 world premiere opera JFK about President John F. Kennedy’s final night and subsequent morning in Fort Worth on Nov. 22, 1963. 
Trying To Rehabiliate One Of History's Most Problematic Operas
David Patrick StearnsWRTI
Opera fans often hope to find some sort of lost masterpiece or even an obscure work by a great composer; which is what the Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns recently encountered at the Bard Summerscape Festival, with the help of a creative team that knows Philadelphians well.
Musa: A Name You'll Remember...
Susan LewisWRTI
The Philadelphia region is rich with music schools training the next generation of artists. South-African bass-baritone Musa Ngqungwana, a recent graduate of the Academy of Vocal Arts and a 2013 winner of the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions, stands out and already has a busy international performance schedule in the upcoming season.
Scaling the Wall: 5 Ways to Get Unsolicited Proposals Heard
Rick CohenNonprofit Quarterly
Philanthropy is, increasingly, a world of insiders. How many foundation websites explain in no uncertain terms that they do not accept unsolicited proposals, or even unsolicited letters of interest? For nonprofits that aren’t already in the foundations’ circles or don’t socialize with the foundation leaders and staff, it looks and feels like an impenetrable, unscalable, concrete wall. 
Indy Opera to develop new artistic vision
Michael Anthony AdamsIndianapolis Star
“The Indianapolis Opera is on the front end of an important period of discovery and reinvention,” said Arnie Hanish, acting president of the Opera’s board of directors. “We are eager to honor the success and tradition of the Opera’s first 40 years, while developing a bright and sustainable strategy for the future.”
Santa Fe Opera’s sustained high note
Anne MidgetteThe Washington Post
The Santa Fe Opera sits like a shining white cloud in the red hills a few miles north of Santa Fe. Beams and cables hold up its roof like the top of a tent, poised for flight. Below this, warm adobe walls gently nudge the open air into the shapes of opera-house tradition, delineating lobbies and gathering places and, of course, the auditorium, its 2,200 seats now sheltered by the roof but still exposed to the elements on the sides. 
An opera contest of Wagnerian proportions
Seattle TimesMelinda Bargreen
The audience voted, the orchestra voted, and the judges also voted. Excitement ran high in McCaw Hall for the third International Wagner Competition, with nine competing singers who have the potential to make careers in one of the most demanding vocal categories of all.
Union Trouble Isn't the Met's Only Problem
Joseph HorowitzThe Wall Street Journal
With New York's Metropolitan Opera embroiled in complex labor talks that threaten the coming 2014-15 season, most of the controversy seems to hinge on whether the proposed salary and benefit cuts are mandated by changing times, or by administrative missteps by General Manager Peter Gelb. As of this writing, a mediator has been called in to scrutinize the company's finances. Wherever that may lead, one exacerbating reality will not change: the Metropolitan Opera House itself. Physically and metaphorically, it signifies a notion of "grand opera" that is increasingly unsustainable
Indianapolis Opera hires Stolen to help assess future
Lou HarryIndianapolis Business Journal
The Indianapolis Opera has hired Steven Stolen, former managing director of the Indiana Repertory Theatre, to direct an assessment and strategic-planning effort.
Stop what you're doing and go see an opera about human trafficking
Carolina A. MirandaLos Angeles Times
It's not every day that someone tells you, "Drop whatever you're doing and go see an opera about human trafficking." But today is one of those days: So drop whatever you're doing this evening and go see an opera about human trafficking. I'm totally serious.
An Early Look at ‘JFK’ Opera
Allan Kozinn The New York Times (ArtsBeat)
David T. Little’s opera JFK, which looks at the 12 hours leading up to John F. Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas, is scheduled to have its world premiere at the Fort Worth Opera on April 23, 2016. But New Yorkers will be able to get an advance look in November. The American Lyric Theater, which is developing the score in a partnership with the Fort Worth company, will present a workshop performance of the opera-in-progress at Merkin Concert Hall on Nov. 25.
Metropolitan Opera Extends Lockout Deadline
Jennifer MaloneyThe Wall Street Journal
The Metropolitan Opera has again extended its lockout deadline, postponing it by another week as an independent financial analyst completes his review of the company’s books, the U.S. Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service said.
Metropolitan Opera Forecasts 'Significantly Larger' Deficit This Year
Jennifer Maloney and Mike ChernyThe Wall Street Journal
The Metropolitan Opera expects its deficit for the fiscal year that ended July 31 to be "significantly larger" than last year's $2.8 million shortfall, according to a newly released financial-disclosure document.
A diva in the twilight of her career inspires new song cycle, at Ravinia
John von RheinThe Chicago Tribune
The prolific American composer Jake Heggie, who has written more than 250 art songs to date, has done so again, creating a song cycle to poems by Emily Dickinson, expressly tailored to the voice and artistry of Kiri Te Kanawa, a close friend and colleague since his college years.
Japan's Ozawa says recovered from illnesses, full of plans
Elaine LiesReuters
Japan's Seiji Ozawa, one of the best-known conductors of his generation, said on Monday he had recovered from health problems including cancer and has many plans for the future, including conducting an opera next year.
Peggy Dye gives Opera Columbus reason to sing
Nancy GilsonThe Columbus Dispatch
In her third year leading Opera Columbus, Peggy Dye — also a lyric soprano — is on a mission to make her beloved art form relevant and popular with audiences of all ages but especially the young.
Metropolitan Opera Postpones Lockout by a Week
Jennifer MaloneyThe Wall Street Journal
The Metropolitan Opera and two of its unions have agreed to hire an independent financial analyst to assess the company's finances, postponing a threatened lockout by another week, officials said Saturday.
Lockout Is Delayed While an Independent Analyst Examines the Met’s Finances
Michael CooperThe New York Times
The Metropolitan Opera, which had threatened to lock out its workers if it did not reach new deals with its labor unions by Sunday night, said Saturday evening that it would extend its current contracts for about a week while an independent analyst examined its finances.
The Longevity of Operatic Careers
Anna Knezevic and Mark KnezevicLinkedIn
The health of an opera singer's vocal chords is vital to the longevity of his or her career. Stressful overuse or improper technique causes burnout or early retirement. We usually hear of this in rock singing, where often singers are self-taught and learn to belt out high tunes, which while sounding impressive for the short term, can wreak havoc in the long term. The same is true for opera singers.
In Final Hours, Metropolitan Opera Extends Contract Deadlines for Unions
Michael CooperThe New York Times
The Metropolitan Opera postponed a threatened lockout late on Thursday night, saying that it had done so at the request of a federal mediator who was brought in at the 11th hour to try to salvage its contract negotiations with the unions representing its orchestra and chorus.
Met Opera, unions extend contract talks
Anne MidgetteThe Washington Post
This is the most heartening progress yet in a negotiation period that has been conducted, throughout the summer, in the public eye. With blog posts, calls to the media, and a steady stream of press releases, both the unions and the Met have done their best to steer the discussion.
Zambello’s Glimmerglass festival: strong parts looking for a greater whole
Anne MidgetteThe Washington Post
Zambello is, of course, the artistic director of the Washington National Opera. But since 2010 — a year before she became WNO’s artistic adviser and two years before assuming her current role — she has been the artistic and general director of Glimmerglass, and she has put her stamp on this once-struggling festival more than she has yet been able to do in Washington.
‘Noli Me Tangere’ Filipino opera will tell moving tale at Kennedy Center
Celia WrenThe Washington Post
The title may translate as “Touch Me Not,” but a team of intrepid producers haven’t hesitated to tackle Noli Me Tangere, which has been called the first full-length Filipino opera composed in the Western operatic tradition. On Aug. 8 and 9, the Kennedy Center’s Eisenhower Theater will host two performances of Noli Me Tangere, a tale of love, intrigue and nationalism set in the Philippines during Spanish colonial rule. 
Speight Jenkins recalls 31 years of Seattle Opera highs, lows
Melinda BargreenThe Seattle Times
You can’t run an opera company without a few mishaps and a lot of memorable moments. Seattle Opera’s retiring general director, Speight Jenkins, shares a few of each from his 31 years in the job.
Labor Struggles at Metropolitan Opera Have a Past
Michael CooperThe New York Times
Now, after three relatively quiet decades, the Met is on the brink of its worst labor crisis in years: Peter Gelb, the Met’s general manager, is threatening to lock out the company’s orchestra, chorus, stage crews and other workers on Friday, endangering the coming opera season, if they do not agree to new contracts with cuts to their pay and benefits. The contracts for 15 unions at the Met expire on Thursday night.
Google (Opera) Glass Makes Debut in Puccini’s Turandot in Italy
Eric SylversDigits (WSJ)
How do you get young people interested in opera? A better pair of opera glasses, of course. In what is being touted as a first, the opera house in Cagliari, the capital of the Italian island of Sardinia, will have some of its singers and musicians wear Google Glass Wednesday night when they perform Puccini’s Turandot, with the images from the digital devices sent in real time to the organization’s Facebook page.
A New Frontier Opera Transports 20th Century New York City to Present Day
StaffSundance
In October 2013, Joshua Frankel (Director) and Judd Greenstein (Composer) participated in the New Frontier Story Lab with the project Untitled Opera about Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs. This innovative opera explores the epic battles between Jane Jacobs and Robert Moses over the future of New York City. From Jacobs’ victory in stopping Moses’ destruction of Washington Square Park, to Moses’ efforts to build the Lower Manhattan Expressway across SoHo, this work catalyzes an important conversation about what principles and values our generation will use in building, managing and sustaining urban spaces in the 21st Century. It is projected to premiere in 2016.

Summer 2014 Magazine Issue
  • Summer Apprenticeships
  • Opera Tours for Board Members
  • My First Opera by Speight Jenkins
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