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Ausrine Stundyte as Cio-Cio-San, Elizabeth Janes as Butterfly’s child and Sarah Larsen as Suzuki in Seattle Opera's production of Puccini's Madama Butterfly. Photo by Elise Bakketun.
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Artist Headlines
Opera Star Joyce DiDonato Will Sing National Anthem at Game 7
Karen CrouseThe New York Times
The Royals starter Jeremy Guthrie was not the only person with Kansas City ties who spent Tuesday fervently hoping for the opportunity to perform on Wednesday at a World Series Game 7. The opera singer Joyce DiDonato, who grew up in Kansas City as an avid baseball fan, got the call from Major League Baseball to sing the national anthem for the game, should it be necessary.
In a Busy Train Station, a Postmodern Opera Takes Shape
Julie BaumgardnerNY Times
“Most people think of opera as institutionalized, like museums,” confides the director Yuval Sharon. “I believe that opera is an emerging art. If you look at developments in all the other fields — visual, theater, music, architecture — everything is moving toward the interdisciplinary; and the interdisciplinary is the kernel of what opera is.” 
Portland Opera makes dramatic move to summer seasons beginning in 2016: 'We want to avoid death by 1,000 paper cuts'
David StablerThe Oregonian
Portland Opera is planning to undergo the biggest change in its 50-year history. Beginning in 2016, the company will perform its entire season in a compressed, 12-week summer period.
Opera Southwest premieres long-forgotten Hamlet opera
StaffAlbuquerque Journal
For Artistic Director Anthony Barrese this was a labor of passion, perhaps obsession. But labor certainly and nonetheless a formidable task. The fruits of his painstaking work at long last came to fruition on Sunday at the National Hispanic Cultural Center when Opera Southwest gave the stunning premiere of the long lost and forgotten “Amleto” (Hamlet) by Franco Faccio. The opera had been performed only once before, the 1865 premiere given by an ailing tenor badly received, causing Faccio to withdraw the work and never compose again.
Sarasota Opera caters to connoisseurs and opera-phobes
Marty ClearBradenton Herald
If you're not an opera fan, your image of the art form is probably shaped by the stereotypes from TV sitcoms or movies. People in tuxedoes sitting in balcony boxes. A large woman in a Viking helmet and pigtails over-emoting as she sings foreign words with an annoying voice. Men who have been forced to attend by their wives falling asleep as the opera stretches into it sixth hour. Or maybe you've just heard opera on the radio and you think it's unintelligible. Those perceptions are wrong.
Florida Grand Opera comes to Hialeah
Marisol MedinaMiami Herald
The visit is part of Opera Lab, a Florida Grand Opera program that visits South Florida high schools throughout the school year to show students how opera can relate to their classes, how they can learn about backstage careers and how to appreciate the centuries-old art form.
Opera for the impatient
Carrie SeidmanSarasota Herald Tribune
Opera, one of the world's most venerable and enduring art forms, has struggled in recent years. Aging patrons, an air of elitism, steep ticket prices, a younger generation's unfamiliarity with the art form and increased competition for the entertainment dollar have all contributed to a gradual decline in attendance.
The Anti-'Klinghoffer' Protests Are the Best Thing That Could Happen to the Metropolitan Opera
Raphael MagarikNew Repbulic
John Adams’s The Death of Klinghoffer opened at the Metropolitan Opera Monday night amid angry protests. The opera is based on the real-life, 1985 hijacking of a cruise-ship by Palestinian terrorists and their brutal killing of Leon Klinghoffer, a wheelchair-bound, 69-year-old American Jew. Inside Lincoln Center, the opera opened with paired choruses—a tense Chorus of Exiled Palestinians and a mournful Chorus of Exiled Jews—while outside, demonstrators shouted, somewhat less mellifluously, “Terror is not art!”
Florentine Opera Offers Residencies For Young Conductors
Bonnie North and Audrey NowakowskiWUWM
A collaboration between The Solti Foundation U.S. and Florentine Opera offers two emerging conductors, one now and one in the spring, private coaching and mentorship as well as opportunities to conduct staging/orchestra rehearsals.
Stickboy a bold gambit for Vancouver Opera
David Gordon DukeThe Vancouver Sun
Even before it opens tonight at the Vancouver Playhouse, Vancouver Opera’s Stickboy (by writer Shane Koyczan and composer Neil Weisensel) has already made its mark on opera culture.

Meryl Streep on for biopic of off-key opera singer Florence Foster Jenkins
Ben ChildThe Guardian
Meryl Streep is to star in a biopic of the famously awful opera singer Florence Foster Jenkins for director Stephen Frears, reports Variety.
Colorful productions of Opera Week celebrate the vocal arts
Mary Kunz Goldman The Buffalo News
Like Viva Vivaldi and “Baba Yaga,” Opera Week is fast becoming an autumn tradition for music-minded Western New Yorkers.

Every year, the celebration – which burst on the scene in 2012 – seems to get a little bit richer. This year’s festival, which kicks off today with a ceremony in the Buffalo and Erie County Central Library, celebrates more than opera. It embraces a wide variety of vocal arts.
Twin Cities Opera and Choral Composer Stephen Paulus Dies at 65
Ian HalubiakClassicalite
A leading figure in Minnesota's classical composing circle and an author of nearly 60 orchestral scores, 10 operas and 150 choral pieces, Stephen Paulus has died. He was 65. The Twin Cities composer, who might be best known for his 1982 opera The Postman Always Rings Twice, suffered a stroke last year that had been affecting his health up until he died Sunday, Oct. 19.

Indiana University Opera Hopes to Score in Football Stadium
Brian WiseOperavore
In the heart of basketball country, Indiana University's football team has long elicited collective sighs and groans. The school generates the second-lowest football revenue in the Big Ten and historically has had trouble filling 52,000-seat Memorial Stadium. The team's fall record is 3-3 – in advance of a daunting match-up Saturday against Michigan State.

All too aware of this, Indiana University's Jacobs School of Music announced Friday that it will present a live simulcast of its production of Puccini's La boheme on the stadium's Jumbotron. The simulcast, dubbed "Opera in the End Zone," will take place on October 24. Tickets will be free.  
De Blasio Blasts Giuliani For Protesting ‘Klinghoffer’ Opera
Ross BarkanNew York Observer
“I don’t want to judge something that I haven’t seen. I think that there’s a serious problem today in the world that has nothing to do with this opera. I’ve spoken about it many times,” he said. “There’s an anti-Semitism problem in this world today, particularly in Western Europe that worries me greatly. That’s where my focus is.”
Multimedia opera probes Wikileaks and Chelsea Manning
Noah HurowitzBrooklyn Daily
"The Source,” a new opera premiering at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on Oct. 22–25, is all about espionage and information. The composer of the piece said he wrote the play after he became fascinated by how Americans interact with an array of data far too vast for any one person to consume.
The Depth of Klinghoffer: What Does the Controversy Say about Freedom of Expression?
Fred PlotkinOperavore
There is an opera at the Metropolitan Opera right now that is causing a great deal of discussion in the media and among the public in which an innocent man is murdered onstage and his killer sings an exultant aria. This opera is Macbeth by Giuseppe Verdi.
Lori Laitman and Dana Gioia Talk About Their New Opera, Opening This Week at Virginia Tech
Susan Dormady EisenbergHuffington Post
The premiere of a new American opera is always a cause for celebration, and a work for children is especially heartening since today's youth should be tomorrow's audience. But the rehearsal phase of Lori Laitman and Dana Gioia's The Three Feathers also offered "something rare," according to Ruth Waalkes, executive director of the Center for the Arts and associate provost for the arts at Virginia Tech, where the opera debuts this week.
Vancouver Opera tackles issue of bullying with ‘Stick Boy’
Ben WilsonNews1311
It’s a provocative, emotional opera that looks at the issue of bullying and what it can do to a young person. Vancouver Opera is presenting the world premiere of “Stick Boy.”
Opera Ithaca launches with 'Bluebeard's Castle'
Barbara Adamsithaca Journal
What began as a stand-alone creative project among four artists — two singers, a pianist and choreographer — ended with founding a new professional opera company in Ithaca.
How Millennials Are Reshaping Charity And Online Giving
Elise HuNPR
Millennials are spending — and giving away their cash — a lot differently than previous generations, and that's changing the game for giving, and for the charities that depend on it.
An Opera Under Fire
Zachary WoolfeThe New York Times
When the arts play with contemporary history, they play with fire. The Metropolitan Opera has learned this lesson anew in the furious protests that have raged in advance of the company premiere, on Monday, of John Adams’s ruminative, unsettled, unsettling 1991 operatic masterpiece, “The Death of Klinghoffer.” Another simple, straightforward title concealing another story of seething pain from the recent past, “Klinghoffer” is a reflection on the 1985 hijacking of the cruise ship Achille Lauro by Palestine Liberation Front militants, who murdered Leon Klinghoffer, a disabled Jewish-American passenger.
When art sings: How paintings have fared on the musical and opera stage
Anne MidgetteThe Washington Post
Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition” is one of the most famous works of concert music; even if you think you don’t know it, you know it. You don’t, however, know the paintings and drawings it was based on, by the artist Viktor Hartmann. Hartmann died at 39; after his abrupt death, friends arranged a show of his work; and Mussorgsky, who adored him, illustrated part of the show, in music, in about three weeks. The result is frequently played in both the original piano and subsequent orchestral version. Most of the images that inspired it have been lost.
San Diego Opera: Progress report
James ChuteSan Diego Union-Tribune
The reborn San Diego Opera continues to make strides. Here’s a progress report.
Opera Theatre of St. Louis announces new Artists-in-Training class
Sarah Bryan MillerSt. Louis Post-Dispatch
It's a new school year, and a new Monsanto Artists-in-Training class has been chosen at Opera Theatre of St. Louis.

This year, there are 23 students from 15 high schools in St. Louis City, County, and Metro East, selected through an intensely competitive audition process. The students will receive weekly college-level vocal coaching from teachers at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville, Washington University and Webster University. Next April 19th, they'll show what they've learned in a recital and scholarship competition with more than $12,000 to be dispersed.
Dance Like an Egyptian
Heidi WalesonThe Wall Street Journal
This year’s 250th anniversary of the death of Jean-Philippe Rameau hasn’t led to any high-profile productions in the U.S., other than the concert version of “Platée” by Les Arts Florissants at Lincoln Center this past spring. So kudos to Opera Lafayette, the intrepid Washington, D.C.-based company that specializes in 18th-century French opera, for mounting “Les Fêtes de l’Hymen et de l’Amour, ou Les Dieux d’Égypte” (1747), in one of their most imaginative productions ever, and bringing it to the Rose Theater at Lincoln Center last Thursday.
Met’s ‘Death of Klinghoffer’ Remains a Lightning Rod
Michael CooperThe New York Times
As the Metropolitan Opera prepares to stage John Adams’s critically acclaimed 1991 opera “The Death of Klinghoffer” on Monday for the first time, it has become enmeshed in a vitriolic debate that often seems to have more to do with the polarizing politics of Israel and the Middle East than the oratorio-like opera its singers have been rehearsing.
Houston Grand Opera to present second mariachi-style work in May
Steven BrownHouston Chronicle
Houston Grand Opera will follow up on the success of its mariachi opera "Cruzar la Cara de la Luna" by presenting a new mariachi-style work by the same creators in May. "El Pasado Nunca Se Termina," or "The Past Is Never Finished," comes from composer Jose "Pepe" Martinez, leader of the band Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlán, and librettist Leonard Foglia." Mariachi Vargas will perform
Syrian refugees join Mozart opera to deliver message of peace
Kieran GuilbertReuters
Appeals for peace in Syria are usually made by politicians and activists calling for ceasefires, negotiations and aid supplies. However, in southwest Germany dozens of Syrian refugees who have, for now, found safe haven after fleeing civil war in their homeland, are delivering a message of peace through opera. A special adaptation of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Cosi fan tutte, which had its premiere in Stuttgart on Sunday, starred several Syrian refugees alongside a cast of international opera singers.
Forget Netrebko. Here’s an Opera With Courtney Love.
Allan Kozinn The New York Times
“I’ve always been fascinated with her,” Mr. Almond said Thursday. “I love her voice, and I think she’s a great actress. And I thought she would find the character interesting.”
The Rumors of Opera's Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated (Pt. 1)
Jennifer RiveraHuffington Post
I first started ruminating on the idea for this post a couple of weeks ago when I was reading some glowing reviews for The Collaborative Works Festival in Chicago. The Collaborative Arts Institute was founded three years ago by three musicians: two of whom, Nicholas Phan and Shannon McGuiness, happen to be friends of mine, and so I have been eagerly following their progress. In only three seasons, the festival has collaborated with world class artists, presenting them in song recitals, and has created an organization which is not only artistically compelling, but also financially stable. All during a time in which a new press outlet or company head bemoans the death of opera and classical singing on a daily basis. The idea that two people I know, in spite of all the odds and the constant barrage of negative press about the "state of opera", managed to create something that makes a real artistic contribution from scratch got me wondering about just how many other companies and festivals featuring classical singing and opera had cropped up during this new millenium.
Paola Prestini: Following Her Vision
Frank J. OteriNewMusicBox
Paola Prestini combines wild imagination and controlled practicality on an almost molecular level—it’s as if both are fused together in her DNA. Whether she’s talking about her own multimedia operas or VisionIntoArt, the interdisciplinary arts production company she co-founded 15 years ago, she tends to think big but she always manages to make it happen.
Forgotten opera 'Amleto' proves worthy of excavation
Tim SmithBaltimore Sun
The first public hearing in 143 years of Franco Faccio's “Amleto,” presented Thursday night by Baltimore Concert Opera in the elegant ballroom of the Engineers Club, offered rewards and frustrations.
Forget Netrebko. Here’s an Opera With Courtney Love.
Allan Kozinn ArtsBeat (The New York Times)
Most productions at the Prototype: Opera/Theater/Now festival seek ways to erode the boundaries between opera and pop. But the composer Todd Almond and the director Kevin Newbury plan to kick those boundaries over entirely. They have cast Courtney Love, the rock singer and widow of Kurt Cobain, as the star of Mr. Almond’s “Kansas City Choir Boy,” which will have its world premiere at the Manhattan Arts Center during the next Prototype festival, Jan. 8 to 17.
Winners Chosen in Program to Aid Female Composers
Allan Kozinn ArtsBeat (The New York Times)
The League of American Orchestras and EarShot, the organizations administering a new program to provide commissions and premieres for scores composed by women, announced the winners of its commissions on Tuesday.
Jessye Norman: Why I Ignore My Critics
StaffBBC
Award-winning opera singer Jessye Norman has explained why she does not read what critics say about her. 
Thousands Converge On Independence Mall For Night Of Opera
Justin UdoCBS
With blankets in hand and coolers filled with goodies, thousands of folks packed onto Independence Mall to watch Opera Philadelphia’s performance of The Barber of Seville as it played on two large screens.
Smog Serenade: Opera in 18 Cars Planned Through Downtown L.A.
Brian WiseOperavore
A Southern California director is planning an opera that will take place inside 18 cars as they simultaneously cruise the streets and highways of Los Angeles. Hopscotch: A Mobile Opera for 18 Cars is the brainchild of Yuval Sharon, the artistic director of the L.A. opera company the Industry, set to debut in the fall of 2015. 
Soprano Nicole Cabell Saves the Day for Washington Concert Opera
Gary TischlerThe Georgetowner
It’s hard to talk about Washington Concert Opera as “show biz,” but what happened to the critically acclaimed company as it prepared for its season opener over last weekend gives rise to that old expression, “That’s show biz!”
[Maltese] Government buys opera tickets for elderly
staffMalta Today
The government has bought opera tickets for old people as part of its active ageing strategy, Parliamentary Secretary Justyne Caruana announced.
Ryan Opera Center Announces 2015-16 Season Ensemble
BWW News deskbroadwayworld.com
Dan Novak, director of The Patrick G. and Shirley W. Ryan Opera Center at Lyric Opera of Chicago , have announced that soprano Diana Newman, mezzo-sopranos Lindsay Metzger and Annie Rosen, tenors Alec Carlson and Mingjie Lei, baritone Takaoki Onishi, and bass Patrick Guetti have been accepted into the prestigious program beginning April 27, 2015.
Maria Callas Opera Academy In Her Old Apartment Approved By Greece
Maria Jean SullivanClassicalite
The now-dilapidated house where opera legend Maria Callas lived from 1940-45 is set to become an opera school itself, approved by Greece.
WQXR Welcomes Deborah Voigt as Inaugural Susan W. Rose Artist-in-Residence
Staffbroadwayworld.com
WQXR, New York City's classical music station, announced today that American operatic soprano and Grammy Award-winner DEBORAH VOIGT has been named the inaugural Susan W. Rose Artist-in-Residence, an annual position awarded to a prominent classical artist.
Next for Yuval Sharon, the Industry: 'Hopscotch,' L.A. opera in 18 cars
Jessica GeltLA Times
From opera on headphones to opera on wheels: The next work from Yuval Sharon and the Industry will unfold in 18 cars cruising downtown L.A., Boyle Heights and the Arts District.
Russia: Opera premiere cancelled after its composer was attacked
stafffreemuse.org
The premiere of a new opera in St. Petersburg has been cancelled after two venues refused to host it and the composer was savagely beaten and death threats were issued.
Party Diary: Opera with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
By Helena Andrews Washington Post
It’s not every day that one gets to audit a history lesson on past chief justices of the United States taught in the Supreme Court and led by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
Muti quits as Rome Opera conductor
John von RheinChicago Tribune
Suddenly, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra has Riccardo Muti almost entirely to itself.

The CSO music director, 73, has abruptly withdrawn as the primary conductor of the Rome Opera after six years, citing ongoing funding, management and labor strife at the Teatro dell’Opera di Roma, at which he holds the title honorary director for life, according to Italian media reports.
Riccardo Muti severs ties with the Opera of Rome
Lizzy DaviesThe Guardian
The star Italian conductor Riccardo Muti has pulled out of two productions and in effect left his flagship position at the Opera of Rome, provoking dismay and hand-wringing over the state of classical music in his native country.
Beth Morrison Projects brings ‘Ouroboros’ to Boston
David WeiningerThe Boston Globe
Even though she’s been based in New York for almost a decade, Beth Morrison knows Boston well. She earned a bachelor’s degree in vocal performance from Boston University, and it was during her exploration of Boston’s independent theater scene that she hatched the idea of forming her own company to produce contemporary opera and music theater works. Today, Beth Morrison Projects is a driving force in the difficult task of guiding new-music projects from conception to stage, with a portfolio that includes works by Nico Muhly, David T. Little, and David Lang.
Britain's killing talent, warns Dame Kiri
Vanessa ThorpeThe Guardian
One of the world's greatest opera stars has made an impassioned plea for Britain to stop blocking the flow of young singers into opera houses so that the top quality talents of the future can flower.

Fall 2014 Magazine Issue
  • Are Women Different?
  • Preparing for Klinghoffer
  • Emerging Artists: Act One


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