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Ausrine Stundyte as Cio-Cio-San, Elizabeth Janes as Butterfly’s child and Sarah Larsen as Suzuki in Seattle Opera's production of Puccini's Madama Butterfly. Photo by Elise Bakketun.
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Administrator/Trustee Resources & Archives
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OPERA America’s comprehensive Archive, containing hundreds of articles, podcasts and videos, is a rich resource of information for artists, company staff and opera patrons alike.

The Archive contains articles from 1999 to the present, covering topics like fundraising, health, marketing, new works, performance skills, mentoring and finance, written by OPERA America staff and outside industry experts.

Podcasts and videos in the Archive provide invaluable access to OPERA America events such as the Annual Conference and Making Connections.

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From the Archives Popular Administrative/Trustee Resources
Refining the Dramatic Rhythm
Kelley Rourke
In an interview for Opera Canada, author and librettist Margaret Atwood likened the writing of a libretto to the construction of a coat-hanger: “If it’s a bad coat-hanger, that will be unfortunate, but if it’s a good coat-hanger, nobody will notice it.”

Is it possible for librettists to assess the sturdiness of their creation before entrusting the extravagant weight of an opera score to its delicate structure? Can words meant for music be evaluated in the absence of that essential element?

The Libretto Reading Series at Brooklyn’s American Opera Projects attempts to do just that, giving artists opportunity to hear a work read aloud and then discuss its structure, characters, themes and pacing. “While obviously spoken theater and opera are two very different art forms, you can look at the dramatic rhythm in a particular way, figuring out where the important beats are before the composer spends months writing music,” says Ned Canty, who is director of the series. “It is useful for a composer to think about beats from a performance perspective, to make sense of where you need a big shift in emotion, to see the amount of time an actor needs to get from one beat to the next.”
Advocacy & Public Policy Update
About OPERA America's Advocacy Efforts Latest News & Alerts
OPERA America represents the interests of the opera community before Congress, the White House and federal agencies. As a founding member of the Performing Arts Alliance, OPERA America works with the performing arts field to advocate for the development of national policies that recognize and strengthen the contributions that the arts make to America.

For more information on OPERA America’s advocacy activities, please contact OPERA America’s Government Affairs Office at 202-375-7523.
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Friday, April 18, 2014
Latest Video & Audio Additions
Visa Processing for Foreign Guest Artists
Jonathan Ginsburg and Andi Floyd, FTM Arts Law
Fundraising for Independent Artists
Dianne Debicella, program director, fiscal sponsorship, Fractured Atlas; Eve Gigliotti, mezzo-soprano; Anne Ricci, general managing diva, Opera on Tap
Taxing Foreign Artists
Robyn Guilliams, FTM Arts Law attorney, Larry Bomback, Director of Finance, OPERA America, Amy Fitterer, Director of Government Affairs, OPERA America
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Current Headlines
Metropolitan Opera Leader Warns of Lockout
By Jennifer MaloneyThe Wall Street JournalWednesday, July 23, 2014
The Metropolitan Opera's general manager said Wednesday that the company would likely lock out its union workers starting Aug. 1, and advised employees to prepare for a work stoppage.
Opera's Old-Fashioned Race Problem
By Gwynn GuilfordThe Atlantic Wednesday, July 23, 2014
For the last two weekends, 38 white amateur performers in Seattle cinched up their obis and daubed on facepaint to perform The Mikado—standard fare for an operetta set on the fictional Japanese island Titipu where characters are given ridiculous names like Nanki-Poo and Yum-Yum.
Revenue, labor woes have Met Opera singing the blues
By Theresa AgovinoCrain's New YorkWednesday, July 23, 2014
Those numbers, and the Met's deficit, are among some of the hard realities facing the company as it attempts to renegotiate contracts with its 15 unions. Many observers think a strike or lockout will occur, which could further damage the Met's shaky finances.
What's the difference between an opera and a musical?
By Tim WongThe TelegraphWednesday, July 23, 2014
The line between operas and musicals is blurring. Earlier this month the English National Opera announced that the company will team up with Michael Grade and Michael Linnit to stage musicals – on top of their regular programme of operas. Aside from making full use of the Coliseum round the year, ENO is hoping that musicals will form part of an "audience development programme", nurturing opera goers of the future.

The changing landscape of audiences
By Shoshana FanizzaAudience Development SpecialistsWednesday, July 23, 2014
“The simple answer is San Jose’s population changed a lot in three decades and the Rep changed very little.”
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Summer 2014 Magazine Issue
  • Summer Apprenticeships
  • Opera Tours for Board Members
  • My First Opera by Speight Jenkins
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